Digital Issues

Posted by 
Eric Baptiste

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Author: Silvermane WesleyjohnVery interested to read that you have become CEO of a Canadian music rights corp, having come from France, and that you are so involved in the music scene there. I am in Southern Oregon, USA, having escaped the very meteorological conditions, terrain and snow-drenching you have gone to! Just kidding, Canada is still great. I am here more for love than anything. I still write and record since my kids have grown and gone, and am living the life of a starving musician. OK, semi-starving, since we live on and are sustained by our farm. Anyway, all the best to you at SOCAN. I have a very wonderful memory of one of SOCAN's seminars visiting my hometown of Ottawa many years ago, and learned a lot I apply to my music career even today. God bless, and au revoir! Silvermane Wesleyjohn Central Point, Oregon, USARead more comments
Posted by 
Eddie Schwartz

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Author: Randy ShookI caught on to the itunes, spotify, bandcamp and equivalent many years ago. When a person downloads a song for 99 cents, they now have the ability to fileshare your song privately. I only submit my music to programs with stable moral standards and practices. So I dont feel like I'm getting ripped off or exploited.Author: Eric BaptisteThanks Mark. I can only add my voice to Eddie's comment and SOCAN fully supports the Fair Trade Music initiative and is actively working on various aspects of it with CIAM and MCNA. We’re helping fund the survey Eddie mentions and we are providing data as well. SOCAN’s mission is to make sure that our 120,000 Canadian members and the millions of foreign songwriters, composers and publishers we represent in Canada receive the just rewards from their talent and hard work. We are proud to license music created by professionals that have to be reasonably paid as professionals because the rights in their music has real value. The Fair Trade Music initiative has great transformative potential here in Canada and around the world. For this reason SOCAN is also helping spread the word in our international trade association, CISAC, in which we play a leadership role.Read more comments
Posted by 
Jean-Robert Bisaillon

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Author: Howard DruckmanMoney may be secondary, but how long can a songwriter continue to toil at their chosen profession if digital royalties become so pitifully small that they're unable to earn a living at it?Author: troyHi. I found this site via the link you printed in the recent Words & Music, Spring 2014. In your article there (pg. 5) you lead one to believe that the statement David Byrne made "Do you really think people are going to keep putting time and effort into this if no one is making any money?" is in some way connected with your idea that music creators will no longer create if remuneration is taken away. This is incorrect. If you reread the Salon article you would realize that David's statement was made in regards to the Spotify creators and the service they have made, and in no way is representative of the creator/songwriter. Songwriters write because they are songwriters first ....money is (and should always be) secondary. It's a rather sad statement that someone on the SOCAN board of directors promotes, in essence, the idea that money comes before creativity.Read more comments
Posted by 
Jean-Robert Bisaillon

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Posted by 
David McPherson

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Author: Michael Day@Tina "As for CDs, the sound quality is the same as a digital wav file or MP4 from iTunes. CDs became unpopular when the same quality music could easily be accessed online. - See more at: http://socanblog.azurewebsites.net/why-youth-are-embracing-vinyl-again/#sthash.kdVaZj8A.dpuf" The above statement is completely false. CDs are 16 bit 44.1k audio. MP4 files from iTunes are 256kbps 16 bit, whereas CDs are around 1400kbps 16 bit. .WAV files, however have nothing to do with quality, as they are a completely lossless and compression-free format. When I mix and master tracks in my studio, the final mix and final master that get put on the disc is .WAV files. .WAV is the simplest, purest form of audio, meaning the file sizes are enormously large. What I hear on my studio monitors is the original master tracks. They are .WAV files, but unlike what you're referring to, they are 24 bit 192k .WAV files. When you burn a CD to your computer, the highest possible quality .WAV you can burn is a 16 bit 44.1k .WAV. This is because when final masters go to disc, all CDs are published in this format and quality. So, when you say CD quality is the same as a digital .WAV file, you're wrong. It CAN be, but depends on everything else. You can convert the shitty .MP4 iTunes files (which are basically just 256kbps MP4 audio) to a .WAV if you like, but it will be nowhere near the quality of a CD, which is nowhere near the quality of the .WAV files in the open ProTools session on my computer when the album was being recorded, mixed, and mastered.Author: TinaGreat article. @Veroniqe - the digital mastering technique of a digital music file to vinyl is much different than mastering into digital format (which is pressed to a Master CD). There is a big difference in sound between the two formats even if the source capture is digital for both. Agreed, the digital production to vinyl sound isn't the exact same analogue sound from yester year but it certainly is "truer" and "purer" to that sound - meaning, warmer and scratchy, less polished. As for CDs, the sound quality is the same as a digital wav file or MP4 from iTunes. CDs became unpopular when the same quality music could easily be accessed online. There is something magical about vinyl. CDs nor digital music can compare with the experience of hearing the needle drop onto your favorite classic album!Read more comments